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COLITIS - there are three main types of colitis:
Ischemic Colitis: Inflammation of the colon resulting from an interruption of the colonic blood supply that did not lead to full-thickness loss of the colonic wall. --  may result from occlusion of a major artery, small vessel disease, venous obstruction, low flow states (eg, cardiogenic shock), or intestinal obstruction.  The typical patient is over 50 and presents with acute left-sided abdominal pain that began in the left iliac fossa.  There may be associated symptoms of cardiovascular disease or collagen vascular disease.  
Antibiotic-Associated Colitis: Acute inflammation of the colon caused by Clostridium difficile and associated with antibiotic use.  Various antibiotics may alter the balance of normal colonic flora and allow overgrowth of C. difficile, an anaerobic gram- positive bacillus.  Diarrhea and colitis are caused by toxins produced by pathogenic strains of C. difficile.  May result from using ampicillin, amoxicillin, erythromycin, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, and quinolones.  Susceptibility increases with age.
Ulcerative Colitis: A chronic, inflammatory, and ulcerative disease arising in the colonic mucosa, characterized most often by bloody diarrhea. -- cause unknown.  Evidence suggests that a genetic predisposition leads to an unregulated intestinal immune response to an environmental, dietary, or infectious agent.  However, no inciting antigen has been identified.  The evidence for a specific mocrobial etiology is even less convincing than for Crohn's disease, and the familial tendency is less pronounced.  Bleeding is the most common local complication.  Another particularly severe complication, toxic colitis, occurs when transmural extension of ulceration results in localized ileus and peritonitis.  As it progresses, the colon loses muscular tone and begins to dilate.  The incidence of colon cancer is increased when the entire colon is involved and the disease last for more than 10 years.  Extracolonic problems include peripheral arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, sacroiliitis, anterior uveitis, erythema nodosum, pyoderma gangrenosum, episcleritis, and retarded growth and development in children.  
TREATMENT: Avoiding raw fruits and vegetables limits mechanical trauma to inflamed colonic mucosa and may lessen symptoms.  A milk-free diet may help. An anticholinergic drug, loperamide, diphenoxylate, deodorized opium tincture, or codeine may be prescribed.  These antidiarrheal drugs must be used with extreme caution in more severe cases because they may precipitate toxic dilation.  In mild cases, hydrocortisone may be prescribed, and because of side effects with oral corticosteroids, enema preparations of new corticosteroid analogs such as budesonide are becoming more widely used.
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INDICATIONS: For temporary relief of symptoms related to muscle and joint pain, fever, chills, nose and sinus congestion, sore throat, ear infection, and gastrointestinal discomfort. INDICATIONS: Colitis, electrolyte depletion, exhaustion, fatigue, flu, gastroenteritis, gastrointestinal distress, kidney dysfunction, muscle cramps, muscle pain, muscle weakness, dehydration, sweat, vomiting INDICATIONS: For temporary relief of allergies caused by dairy products, foods, tobacco, wheat, bowel disorders including celiac disease, colitis, poor digestion, back and neck pain and asthma.
For the temporary relief of symptoms related to muscle and joint pain, fever, chills, nose and sinus congestion, irritated throat, and gastrointestinal discomfort. For the temporary relief of symptoms relating to electrolyte imbalance such as dizziness and fatigue. For temporary relief of symptoms related to respiratory conditions such as cough, mucous congestion.
INDICATIONS: For temporary relief of symptoms related to menadione sensitivity including colitis, diarrhea, gas, abdominal cramps, rash, headache, varicose veins and arthritis. Menadione is related to Vitamin K production. INDICATIONS: For temporary relief of sensitivity to wool, including gas, bloating, headache, insomnia, gastrointestinal distress and depression. If patient is positive to pyrrole, check gallic acid, norepinephrine, and menadione. INDICATIONS: For temporary relief of symptoms related to tryptophan sensitivity including sleep disorders, bloating, colitis, poor digestion, celiac disease, flatulence, gastritis, constipation, digestive malabsorption, food sensitivities, sleep disorder
For temporary relief of symptoms related to Menadione sensitivity including diarrhea, gas, abdominal cramps, rash, headache, and varicose veins. For temporary relief of symptoms related to sensitivity to wool, including gas, bloating, and headache. For temporary relief of symptoms related to tryptophan sensitivity including sleep issues, bloating, poor digestion, flatulence, constipation, and food sensitivities.
INDICATIONS: For temporary relief of symptoms related to amoeba infestation including chronic dysentery and consequent weakness and dehydration, bloody stools, jaundice, fever, weight loss, and stomach cramps. For temporary relief of symptoms related to parasite infestation including diarrhea, colic, vermifuge, digestive aid, flatulence, intestinal problems, constipation, spasms, gallstones, colitis, and jaundice. INDICATIONS: Gastric Ulcers, Duodenal Ulcer, Heartburn, Mucous Congestion, Diarrhea, Gout, Crohn’s Disease, Diverticulosis, Gastritis, Colitis
For the temporary relief of symptoms related to amoeba infestation including consequent weakness, fever, and stomach cramps. For temporary relief of symptoms related to parasite infestation including occasional diarrhea, digestive problems, flatulence, occasional constipation, and spasms. Gastro

INDICATIONS: Gastric Ulcers, Duodenal Ulcer, Heartburn, Mucous Congestion, Diarrhea, Gout, Crohn’s Disease, Diverticulosis, Gastritis, Colitis
   
 
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